Driving WinTech talks to Halifax

Driving WinTech Event Recap

Hello Halifax! Community Conversation recap

Hal1
Hal3

By Raman Kang

The location: Halifax, Nova Scotia. The date: November 1.

After 8.5 weeks, 13,000 km and 30 events, Driving Wintech arrived at its second-last stop. Volta Labs served as headquarters for the Community Conversation. Panelists Stephanie Holmes-Winton, Arylene Reycraft and Jenn Priske led the charge. One after another, they spoke about how they got their start, the lessons they’ve learned and the advice they would give to young people. Proudly sponsored by Volta, with the support of community partner Digital Nova Scotia and Techsploration, this event got people talking.

Stephanie, Founder and CEO of Money Finder Software Inc., didn’t intend to go into tech. When she realized she wasn’t getting what she needed from financial advisors, she decided to start her own business. After failures and mishaps, she taught herself software, hired good leaders and built a supportive team. When asked what the greatest advantage of being a women in tech is, she cited female insight. “Women own 78% of the buying power. We need to redefine lady business to encompass all businesses. If you only rely on male insight, you’re only speaking to half the population.” She reminded the audience to live by their core values and lead by example.

The importance of having good leaders and mentors couldn’t be emphasized enough by Arylene, Executive Director of Techsplorartion. This non-profit provides high school girls an opportunity to explore the science, trades and technology fields. Arylene is a single parent of two daughters, who saw her kids being left behind and uninterested in these subjects. She realized there are some messages  people need to hear over and over again because they tend to remember the negative and forget the positive. “You can do it needs to be repeated until we can’t hear it anymore!”  

Jenn, an executive at REDSpace Inc., felt women undermine themselves because they don’t think they’re smart enough or good enough. She encouraged self-confidence, something that helped her reach the level of most senior female at REDspace. She felt that young girls aren’t encouraged to take risks and that’s something that needs to change because it’s a great advantage to have women in the tech field.  

Jenn said that she sees opportunity in the tech sector of Halifax, “Every business needs tech and needs people who are innovative to help push their business.” She wanted the crowd to see the fact that there are fewer women in the tech field as an opportunity to get an opportunity. She advised the audience to disregard gender inequality in the tech field and just go for what they want from it.

Women are beyond capable of succeeding in the tech field and this great panel was evidence of that. But they reminded us that success starts with having good role models, encouragement and support. Their final note : the tech field needs women –  so don’t be afraid to fail.

Driving WinTech talks to Halifax

Driving WinTech Event Recap

Hello Halifax! Community Conversation recap

Hal1
Hal3

By Raman Kang

The location: Halifax, Nova Scotia. The date: November 1.

After 8.5 weeks, 13,000 km and 30 events, Driving Wintech arrived at its second-last stop. Volta Labs served as headquarters for the Community Conversation. Panelists Stephanie Holmes-Winton, Arylene Reycraft and Jenn Priske led the charge. One after another, they spoke about how they got their start, the lessons they’ve learned and the advice they would give to young people. Proudly sponsored by Volta, with the support of community partner Digital Nova Scotia and Techsploration, this event got people talking.

Stephanie, Founder and CEO of Money Finder Software Inc., didn’t intend to go into tech. When she realized she wasn’t getting what she needed from financial advisors, she decided to start her own business. After failures and mishaps, she taught herself software, hired good leaders and built a supportive team. When asked what the greatest advantage of being a women in tech is, she cited female insight. “Women own 78% of the buying power. We need to redefine lady business to encompass all businesses. If you only rely on male insight, you’re only speaking to half the population.” She reminded the audience to live by their core values and lead by example.

The importance of having good leaders and mentors couldn’t be emphasized enough by Arylene, Executive Director of Techsplorartion. This non-profit provides high school girls an opportunity to explore the science, trades and technology fields. Arylene is a single parent of two daughters, who saw her kids being left behind and uninterested in these subjects. She realized there are some messages  people need to hear over and over again because they tend to remember the negative and forget the positive. “You can do it needs to be repeated until we can’t hear it anymore!”

Jenn, an executive at REDSpace Inc., felt women undermine themselves because they don’t think they’re smart enough or good enough. She encouraged self-confidence, something that helped her reach the level of most senior female at REDspace. She felt that young girls aren’t encouraged to take risks and that’s something that needs to change because it’s a great advantage to have women in the tech field.

Jenn said that she sees opportunity in the tech sector of Halifax, “Every business needs tech and needs people who are innovative to help push their business.” She wanted the crowd to see the fact that there are fewer women in the tech field as an opportunity to get an opportunity. She advised the audience to disregard gender inequality in the tech field and just go for what they want from it.

Women are beyond capable of succeeding in the tech field and this great panel was evidence of that. But they reminded us that success starts with having good role models, encouragement and support. Their final note : the tech field needs women –  so don’t be afraid to fail.

Everyone knows that we are living in an increasingly tech-enabled world. Not surprisingly, this is reflected in the number of jobs that are now available in the tech industry. The problem is, while the Computer Science workforce has grown by 60% since 1991, the percentage of young women going into the industry has declined (Stats Canada 2011). This needs to change.