The Driving WinTech Tour talks to Saint John

Driving WinTech Event Recaps

Driving WinTech Community Conversation in Saint John, New Brunswick

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By Shahbano Zaman

The Driving WinTech Community Conversation drove into Saint John on October 25. The lively event was held at Connexion Works and was made possible by the support of Enterprise Saint John. The evening panel was moderated by Cathy Simpson, with panelists: Sharon Rathod, Project Manager at Mariner; Daniella DeGrace, CEO at ProcedureFlow; Rose Burley, Solution Designer at JD Irving.

Questions to the panel included:

  • How did you get started in tech?
  • What has kept you in tech sector?
  • What are your thoughts and experiences regarding diversity?
  • What advice would you give to children about opportunities in tech right now?
  • Your proudest accomplishment in the tech industry in New Brunswick?

Danielle described herself as a curious person who enjoys challenges. She was drawn to technology because it’s always changing. Having been a part of four start-ups, she expressed her passion to combine tech, business, customers and partners. When serving a mostly female market she was able to hire many women, but still saw a male majority in other companies. She described how women bring balance, creativity and perspective to the workplace. Her advice to the audience: “Develop self-awareness. Know your likes and skills. Once you have them figured out, leverage them. Know that you are enough.” Her greatest accomplishment has been mentoring a circle of young women who are growing in the tech community.

After studying computer science in India, Sharon moved to Saint John to pursue an MBA. She was drawn to tech because she’s motivated by challenges and inspired by people in this field. Regarding diversity, she noted that everyone brings their own skill set, but finds women are more emotionally intelligent. Her advice is to take risks, adding that it’s okay to fail and more important to try. Being part of a wonderful company and mentoring others has been a source of pride. Watching the transformation of people who “don’t know what they don’t know” to confidence has been gratifying.

Rose grew up on a farm in the 1990’s, during the early days of the internet. She earned a degree in Computer Engineering followed by a Masters in Bio-edical Engineering. She loves IT because, “I get to build cool stuff.” In her current role she transforms the way people do business and the way the world works. Her passion is data and analytics. She has felt like a minority in the workplace, but is encouraged by companies with a balanced gender ratio. Her advice to the audience: “In order to be successful you have to try and fail. Keep pushing yourself to try because failure builds confidence and character.” One of her top accomplishment has been watching someone she trained flourish and thrive.

We thank Enterprise Saint John for their sponsorship.

Stay tuned for recommendations in future blog series.

The Driving WinTech Tour talks to Saint John

Driving WinTech Event Recaps

Driving WinTech Community Conversation in Saint John, New Brunswick

SJ1
SJ2

By Shahbano Zaman

The Driving WinTech Community Conversation drove into Saint John on October 25. The lively event was held at Connexion Works and was made possible by the support of Enterprise Saint John. The evening panel was moderated by Cathy Simpson, with panelists: Sharon Rathod, Project Manager at Mariner; Daniella DeGrace, CEO at ProcedureFlow; Rose Burley, Solution Designer at JD Irving.

Questions to the panel included:

  • How did you get started in tech?
  • What has kept you in tech sector?
  • What are your thoughts and experiences regarding diversity?
  • What advice would you give to children about opportunities in tech right now?
  • Your proudest accomplishment in the tech industry in New Brunswick?

Danielle described herself as a curious person who enjoys challenges. She was drawn to technology because it’s always changing. Having been a part of four start-ups, she expressed her passion to combine tech, business, customers and partners. When serving a mostly female market she was able to hire many women, but still saw a male majority in other companies. She described how women bring balance, creativity and perspective to the workplace. Her advice to the audience: “Develop self-awareness. Know your likes and skills. Once you have them figured out, leverage them. Know that you are enough.” Her greatest accomplishment has been mentoring a circle of young women who are growing in the tech community.

After studying computer science in India, Sharon moved to Saint John to pursue an MBA. She was drawn to tech because she’s motivated by challenges and inspired by people in this field. Regarding diversity, she noted that everyone brings their own skill set, but finds women are more emotionally intelligent. Her advice is to take risks, adding that it’s okay to fail and more important to try. Being part of a wonderful company and mentoring others has been a source of pride. Watching the transformation of people who “don’t know what they don’t know” to confidence has been gratifying.

Rose grew up on a farm in the 1990’s, during the early days of the internet. She earned a degree in Computer Engineering followed by a Masters in Bio-edical Engineering. She loves IT because, “I get to build cool stuff.” In her current role she transforms the way people do business and the way the world works. Her passion is data and analytics. She has felt like a minority in the workplace, but is encouraged by companies with a balanced gender ratio. Her advice to the audience: “In order to be successful you have to try and fail. Keep pushing yourself to try because failure builds confidence and character.” One of her top accomplishment has been watching someone she trained flourish and thrive.

We thank Enterprise Saint John for their sponsorship.

Stay tuned for recommendations in future blog series.

Everyone knows that we are living in an increasingly tech-enabled world. Not surprisingly, this is reflected in the number of jobs that are now available in the tech industry. The problem is, while the Computer Science workforce has grown by 60% since 1991, the percentage of young women going into the industry has declined (Stats Canada 2011). This needs to change.