The Driving WinTech Tour talks to Prince George

Driving WinTech Event Recaps

Driving WinTech Community Conversation Recap - Prince George

PG4

By Shahbano Zaman

The Driving WinTech Community Conversation was held at The Hubspace (Powered by Innovation Central) in Prince George. The session pivoted around the question, ‘What stories, insights and tips can you provide to the women in your tech community?’ Moderator Zoë Meletis began the session by having each audience member introduce themselves and this revealed a wide mix of people. 

Questions to the panel included:

  •        Thoughts on the current state of the Prince George tech ecosystem
  •        How they entered the tech world and experiences leading them to their careers
  •        Learning opportunities they experienced
  •        What resources or supports helped them
  •        Advantages of being a women in tech
  •        Advice to the next generation of women in tech

Shiloh Carson, Geotechnical Division Manager at McElhanney Consulting Services Ltd. nearly entered medicine before a high school teacher introduced her to engineering. Passion and determination helped her overcome her parents’ preference that she study something else. These character traits helped her forge her path. She carved out a place as the first and only female engineer at McElhanney Consulting Services.

Lynda Pattie, Executive Director at AscenTECH solutions Inc. started her tech journey in a pre-internet world. She followed her intuition that said, “This computing thing is going to take off.” She counts people she’s worked with and mentors and coaches as key resources on her trajectory. Those who encourage you and help you see that, “You are your only limitation”, were invaluable. Lynda feels like an equal in tech, and urges aspiring women to be confident, competent.

Cheryll Turcotte, Data Specialist, Programmer at Business2Mobile Communications Inc. got her entrepreneurial start at age 11. That was the day she had her parents co-sign a loan to build her own photography darkroom. She considers the tech community in Prince George to be underused. She is also concerned about the region’s brain-drain, with students moving away from Prince George. She advised to take advantage of grants and online information to build knowledge and skills. More immediately, she urged women to avoid the tendency to sound uncertain and questioning. She wants women to make themselves sound confident and strong.

Some common themes that emerged through the session:

  •        An open mind and hard work lead to opportunities and a steep learning curve – success will follow!
  •        Strive to network, build relationships and find mentors
  •        There is a dire need for events such as this, particularly in Prince George, to connect the tech community with entrepreneurs

More recommendations from the panel to follow in future blog series!

Driving WinTech extends thanks to sponsor AscenTech and community partner Innovation Central Society “Inspiring Women Among Us (IWAU).”

The Driving WinTech Tour talks to Prince George

Driving WinTech Event Recaps

Driving WinTech Community Conversation Recap - Prince George

PG4

By Shahbano Zaman

The Driving WinTech Community Conversation was held at The Hubspace (Powered by Innovation Central) in Prince George. The session pivoted around the question, ‘What stories, insights and tips can you provide to the women in your tech community?’ Moderator Zoë Meletis began the session by having each audience member introduce themselves and this revealed a wide mix of people.

Questions to the panel included:

  •        Thoughts on the current state of the Prince George tech ecosystem
  •        How they entered the tech world and experiences leading them to their careers
  •        Learning opportunities they experienced
  •        What resources or supports helped them
  •        Advantages of being a women in tech
  •        Advice to the next generation of women in tech

Shiloh Carson, Geotechnical Division Manager at McElhanney Consulting Services Ltd. nearly entered medicine before a high school teacher introduced her to engineering. Passion and determination helped her overcome her parents’ preference that she study something else. These character traits helped her forge her path. She carved out a place as the first and only female engineer at McElhanney Consulting Services.

Lynda Pattie, Executive Director at AscenTECH solutions Inc. started her tech journey in a pre-internet world. She followed her intuition that said, “This computing thing is going to take off.” She counts people she’s worked with and mentors and coaches as key resources on her trajectory. Those who encourage you and help you see that, “You are your only limitation”, were invaluable. Lynda feels like an equal in tech, and urges aspiring women to be confident, competent.

Cheryll Turcotte, Data Specialist, Programmer at Business2Mobile Communications Inc. got her entrepreneurial start at age 11. That was the day she had her parents co-sign a loan to build her own photography darkroom. She considers the tech community in Prince George to be underused. She is also concerned about the region’s brain-drain, with students moving away from Prince George. She advised to take advantage of grants and online information to build knowledge and skills. More immediately, she urged women to avoid the tendency to sound uncertain and questioning. She wants women to make themselves sound confident and strong.

Some common themes that emerged through the session:

  •        An open mind and hard work lead to opportunities and a steep learning curve – success will follow!
  •        Strive to network, build relationships and find mentors
  •        There is a dire need for events such as this, particularly in Prince George, to connect the tech community with entrepreneurs

More recommendations from the panel to follow in future blog series!

Driving WinTech extends thanks to sponsor AscenTech and community partner Innovation Central Society “Inspiring Women Among Us (IWAU).”

Everyone knows that we are living in an increasingly tech-enabled world. Not surprisingly, this is reflected in the number of jobs that are now available in the tech industry. The problem is, while the Computer Science workforce has grown by 60% since 1991, the percentage of young women going into the industry has declined (Stats Canada 2011). This needs to change.