Canadian WinTech Resource Series

Community Spotlight: The Maritime Provinces

Canada’s Maritime provinces are expanding their tech resources, offering new support for women eager to join the tech sector.

Welcome back to the Canadian WinTech Resource Series. We help navigate the tech ecosystem in Canada by curating resources to help and support women in tech. This installation focuses on our Maritime provinces.

Charlottetown       

With a population of approximately 36,000 people, Charlottetown is a flourishing community located on Prince Edward Island. From tales of Anne of Green Gables to lobster festivals, PEI has a lot to offer. Although the backbone of the island’s economy is farming, technology is one of the fastest growing sectors. Programs to promote education for women in trades have increased dramatically. Tech resources and support are on the rise in Charlottetown and becoming more readily available.

Tech Resources and Support in Charlottetown:

The Employment Journey on PEI: This monthly publication provides resources including job opportunities, self-employment toolkits, education, and training. Resources span several sectors and include local and federal guidelines, and workforce information. Newcomers to town will find an introduction to PEI.  

Women’s Network PEI: This not-for-profit strengthens and supports PEI’s women through health, justice, education, and empowerment. The organization works to improve the status of women in society by promoting equality, providing forums and recognizing achievements.

Greater Charlottetown Area Chamber of Commerce: The GCACC is a non-profit organization for a diverse network of business professionals who share a keen interest in the economic development of the area. The Chamber provides representation, benefits, education and networking opportunities for its members.

Startup Charlottetown: This grassroots group brings together people who are passionate about collaboration, innovation and learning. They know the importance of connecting like-minded individuals through community participation to create new companies in PEI.

Halifax

The capital of Nova Scotia, Halifax has been voted one of the best places to live in Canada. With one of the world’s largest natural harbors and the oldest lighthouse in North America, this city is worth a visit. Although agriculture, fishing, mining, forestry and natural gas extraction are the primary industries, the technology sector has seen a steady rise in recent years.

Tech resources and support in Halifax:

Women Unlimited: This non-profit works with industry, governments, educational institutions and the community to promote women in trades and technology. Women Unlimited embraces diversity and confronts the systemic barriers women in trades and tech face.

Women in Technology Society: The Dalhousie Women in Technology Society (WiTS) supports female students seeking to pursue a degree in Dalhousie University’s STEM programs. The society introduces female students to technology-related programs. They also host events for the community of technology enthusiasts.

Nova Scotia Women in Technology Facebook Group: Through networking and support, this group aims to increase influence for women in tech.

Ladies Learning Code Halifax: This nonprofit organization strives to be the top resource for women who are passionate about tech. Members increase their technical skills through hands-on collaborative work.

Halifax Chamber of Commerce: Through their Grow Halifax initiative, the chamber brings entrepreneurs closer to the resources they need. They help grow business, knowledge, and networks through opportunity, education, and events.

Canadian WinTech Resource Series

Community Spotlight: The Maritime Provinces

Canada’s Maritime provinces are expanding their tech resources, offering new support for women eager to join the tech sector.

Welcome back to the Canadian WinTech Resource Series. We help navigate the tech ecosystem in Canada by curating resources to help and support women in tech. This installation focuses on our Maritime provinces.

Charlottetown

With a population of approximately 36,000 people, Charlottetown is a flourishing community located on Prince Edward Island. From tales of Anne of Green Gables to lobster festivals, PEI has a lot to offer. Although the backbone of the island’s economy is farming, technology is one of the fastest growing sectors. Programs to promote education for women in trades have increased dramatically. Tech resources and support are on the rise in Charlottetown and becoming more readily available.

Tech Resources and Support in Charlottetown:

The Employment Journey on PEI: This monthly publication provides resources including job opportunities, self-employment toolkits, education, and training. Resources span several sectors and include local and federal guidelines, and workforce information. Newcomers to town will find an introduction to PEI.

Women’s Network PEI: This not-for-profit strengthens and supports PEI’s women through health, justice, education, and empowerment. The organization works to improve the status of women in society by promoting equality, providing forums and recognizing achievements.

Greater Charlottetown Area Chamber of Commerce: The GCACC is a non-profit organization for a diverse network of business professionals who share a keen interest in the economic development of the area. The Chamber provides representation, benefits, education and networking opportunities for its members.

Startup Charlottetown: This grassroots group brings together people who are passionate about collaboration, innovation and learning. They know the importance of connecting like-minded individuals through community participation to create new companies in PEI.

Halifax

The capital of Nova Scotia, Halifax has been voted one of the best places to live in Canada. With one of the world’s largest natural harbors and the oldest lighthouse in North America, this city is worth a visit. Although agriculture, fishing, mining, forestry and natural gas extraction are the primary industries, the technology sector has seen a steady rise in recent years.

Tech resources and support in Halifax:

Women Unlimited: This non-profit works with industry, governments, educational institutions and the community to promote women in trades and technology. Women Unlimited embraces diversity and confronts the systemic barriers women in trades and tech face.

Women in Technology Society: The Dalhousie Women in Technology Society (WiTS) supports female students seeking to pursue a degree in Dalhousie University’s STEM programs. The society introduces female students to technology-related programs. They also host events for the community of technology enthusiasts.

Nova Scotia Women in Technology Facebook Group: Through networking and support, this group aims to increase influence for women in tech.

Ladies Learning Code Halifax: This nonprofit organization strives to be the top resource for women who are passionate about tech. Members increase their technical skills through hands-on collaborative work.

Halifax Chamber of Commerce: Through their Grow Halifax initiative, the chamber brings entrepreneurs closer to the resources they need. They help grow business, knowledge, and networks through opportunity, education, and events.

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Community Conversation Recap – Saint John

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Community Conversation Recap – Fredericton

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Everyone knows that we are living in an increasingly tech-enabled world. Not surprisingly, this is reflected in the number of jobs that are now available in the tech industry. The problem is, while the Computer Science workforce has grown by 60% since 1991, the percentage of young women going into the industry has declined (Stats Canada 2011). This needs to change.